New words for obscure sorrows

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNgyEmYyQF4 I love learning new words. (And writing them down.) All the better when they are invented words. John Koenig's Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows is a collection of words Koenig has created—inspired by real etymology—for specific emotions that don't have precise English words to describe them. Tell me you haven't felt every one of these: … Continue reading New words for obscure sorrows

Päntsdrunk, baby box, Moomin, and Finland’s other official emojis

God bless Finland, my ancestral homeland. First, there's the new book Pantsdrunk (Kalsarikanni): The Finnish Path to Relaxation (Drinking at Home Alone in your Underwear) by Miska Rantanen. From the publisher: Danes have hygge. Swedes have lagom. But the Finnish secret to contentment is faster and easier—"kalsarikänni" or pantsdrunk—drinking at home, alone, in your underwear. When it comes to … Continue reading Päntsdrunk, baby box, Moomin, and Finland’s other official emojis

What a Chad

I get the Word of the Day from Merriam-Webster, the OED, and Urban Dictionary in my RSS feed every day, which usually make for a lively bunch. Well, today, May 8, 2018, Urban Dictionary's Word of the Day is What A Chad: A phrase describing a stereotypical young urban white male, typically single and in his … Continue reading What a Chad

No More ‘More’: Against Irregular Superlatives

Who's ready for a grammatical crusade of pedantic proportions?! Get in on this: It's time to standardize English comparative and superlative adjectives. Those are used when you are comparing one or more things. For example, a banana can be big, bigger, or biggest. The -er and -est progression is common and used for most adjectives. The … Continue reading No More ‘More’: Against Irregular Superlatives